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Why Bringing Back a Wooly Mammoth Is No Longer Science Fiction Why Bringing Back a Wooly Mammoth Is No Longer Science Fiction

Dr. George Church is a real-life Dr. Frankenstein. The inventor of CRISPR and one of the minds behind the Human Genome Project is no longer content just reading and editing DNA—now he wants to make new life. In Ben Mezrich’s latest book, Wooly: The True Story of the Quest to Revive One of History’s Most Iconic Extinct…

If You Resurrect the Woolly Mammoth, Can You Still Call It a Woolly Mammoth? If You Resurrect the Woolly Mammoth, Can You Still Call It a Woolly Mammoth?

In the early 20th century, seeking riches, fur and its medicinal qualities, the people of Europe hunted the Eurasian beaver to near extinction. Clever scientists, though, had an idea of how to atone for their sins. The North American beaver, at least from the outside, seemed nearly identical. They would introduce this…

Scientists Have an Insane Plan to Stop These Rhinos From Going Extinct Scientists Have an Insane Plan to Stop These Rhinos From Going Extinct

In a lush conservation park in central Kenya, the world’s last three northern white rhinos are unable to breed. When they die, the subspecies will go extinct. That is unless a complex, controversial plan involving tissue cryobanks and test tube embryos can actually work.

The Jurassic Park Science to Bring Back Dinosaurs Is Almost Here The Jurassic Park Science to Bring Back Dinosaurs Is Almost Here

Twenty five years ago, Michael Crichton captured our imaginations with the crazy idea that scientists might one day resurrect dinosaurs. But on the eve of Jurassic World’s release a quarter century later, the prospect of bringing back extinct creatures is looking a lot less science fictional.

Scientists Have Transplanted Mammoth DNA Into Elephant Cells Scientists Have Transplanted Mammoth DNA Into Elephant Cells

For the first time in over 3,000 years, the functional components of wooly mammoth DNA have been brought to life (albeit in a petri dish). The achievement represents an important step towards potential efforts to bring the extinct species back.

The Quest to Resurrect an Extinct Animal Without Cloning The Quest to Resurrect an Extinct Animal Without Cloning

Before there was the cow, there was the auroch, a sinewy beast that roamed Eurasia by the millions. And over thousands of years, humans bred the creature into the millions of milk-and-steak-machines we have today. The last auroch, however, died in the 17th century. A group of scientists now want to bring back the…

​Jurassic Park: From The Perspective Of The Bloodsucking Lawyer ​Jurassic Park: From The Perspective Of The Bloodsucking Lawyer

So, we are going to do this. In our lifetimes, we will genetically engineer an extinct species and bring it back from oblivion.

Russian scientists: We have a "high chance" of cloning a wooly mammoth Russian scientists: We have a "high chance" of cloning a wooly mammoth

An exquisitely preserved wooly mammoth is currently undergoing an autopsy in Siberia. Some experts believe they'll be able to extract high quality DNA and cells from the remains which could conceivably be used to clone the extinct mammal. The question now is, should we?

Should we start de-extincting species that have died out? Should we start de-extincting species that have died out?

Futurist Stewart Brand, founder of The Long Now Foundation, has a new mission in life. He wants to bring extinct species back from the dead. Some ecologists thing that's an awful idea. Here are the arguments on both sides of the de-extincting debate.

Dinosaurs could be brought back by 'de-evolving' birds Dinosaurs could be brought back by 'de-evolving' birds

It's looking extremely unlikely that we'll ever be able to revive dinosaurs using their fossilized DNA, but if a British biochemist is right, we may be able to recreate these ancient animals by rewinding the DNA of birds.

In the coastal UK town of Dungeness, the extinct short-haired bumblebee has returned and is thriving. This is fantastic news, especially since bee extinctions are a serious concern. Without bees, it will be almost impossible to raise crops like apples, onions and broccoli that depend on bees for fertilization.

For the first time, scientists have grown the embryos of an extinct species For the first time, scientists have grown the embryos of an extinct species

Just a few days ago, we were asking if de-extinction was possible, and today, we're a huge step closer to bringing recently extinct species back to life. Researchers have announced that they've grown early-stage embryos of the gastric-brooding frog, a species that has been extinct since 1983.

Is de-extinction possible? Find out right now. Is de-extinction possible? Find out right now.

De-extinction is the act of bringing an entire species back from the grave. It's the real-life version of Jurassic Park. And tomorrow, National Geographic and the Long Now Foundation are sponsoring a special TEDxDeExtinction event, where scientists and researchers are discussing whether we'll ever bring back mastodons…

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